Delightful! Dead Writers Theatre Collective Presents The Importance of Being Earnest at Athenaeum Theatre (July 2, 2016)

Imagine this review bring read in an English Accent.

John Worthing seeks an escape from the dull rural life with his young ward, Cecily. He creates a fictitious brother named Earnest who lives in London that he must visit often. When he is in the city, he goes by the name Earnest and hangs out with Algernon. John falls for Algernon’s cousin, Gwendolen. Then, Algernon travels to the country and pretends to be John’s brother, Earnest, in order to meet Cecily. Later on, Cecily and Gwendolen meet and discover that they are both engaged to “Earnest”. Let the chaos ensue!

earnest

The Importance of Being Earnest is now seen as Wilde’s love letter to the Victorian gay community.  “Earnest was a secret code word known among the gay crowd for homosexual while Bunburying was a double pun for gay sex,” states DWTC director Jim Schneider. “This play was Wilde’s gay statement to the aristocracy whose hypocrisy he despised. The general audience was unaware of Wilde’s joke, but he got what would turn out to be his parting shot. Wilde was imprisoned for sodomy a few weeks later.”

The production of this play is incredibly well done. All three acts have a completely different set. All the actors play their characters hilariously with great English accents. It’s an absolute joy to watch and the two hours and 45 minutes (with two intermissions) fly by. It’s a delightful theatre experience.

Get tickets now for The Importance of Being Earnest through July 31st!

Quinn Delaney

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